StanleyParkVan.com  - The most information about Stanley Park in Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Portugese Joe Statue

Portugese Joe Statue
Portugese Joe Statue

The Portugese Joe statue is the newest statue (2015) in Stanley Park.

plaque at the Portugese Joe Statue
plaque at the Portugese Joe Statue

The plaque in front of the statue says:

SHORE TO SHORE

by Stz'uminus Master Carver, Ts'uts'umult Luke Marston

This scupture, carved in cedar then cast in bronze, is a tribute to the ancestral connection between this area's aboriginal and Portugese communities.

Portugese Joe Silvey was a resourceful pioneer who came to BC from Portugal's Azores Islands around 1860.  Born in Musqueam, pqalten:at is of Musqueam and Squamish descent and was Silvey's first wife.  She is shown wearing dentalium shell headdress and shawl, befitting a high born matriarch from the traditional territories of this area.  pqalten:at died quite young from tuberculosis.  Silvey then married Kwatleematt (Lucy), a Shisha71h (Sechelt) First Nation matriarch.  Kwatleematt is depicted wearing a traditional woven cedar hat.

Both women hold fishing net needles for creating and mending nets and mat creasers used to create sharp edges on cattail and tule mats.  The seine nets at Joe's feet and the whaling harpoon in his hand refer to how the Silvey family and local First Nations made their living.  The 11 Pacific salmon represent the Silvey children.

The three figures stand beneath a 14-foot cod lure topped with a raptor hea representing both the eagle and the acor, an Azorean raptor.  The three panels of the lure stand for the three local First Nations: the Musqueam, Squamis, and Tsleil-Waututh.  The intricate mosaic tile base is made from stone imported from Portugal where it is used to create black and white patterns known as Calcada Portuguesa (Portuguese pavement).  It was lade by Azorean master stonemason Carlos Menezes and designed by Luke Marston.

The Silvey family lived here, at Brockton Point(1) in a community of First Nation, Portugese and Hawaiian people. Later the family moved to Reid Island.

This sculpture was created by the artist Luke Marston a great-great grandson of Portugese Joes Silvey and Kwatleematt (Lucy).  He is one of thousands of descendants of the Coast Salish and Portugese communities whose strong contributions and lasting legacy have helped build the province of British Columbia.

(1) The location referred to as Brockton Point is named Spapeyeq in the language of the Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh, and P'apeyek in the language of the Squamish.

DONORS

Canadian Heritage, Legacy Fund, Portugese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Consulate General of Portugal in Vancouver, Musqueam Indian Band, Squamish Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Filomeno and Maria de Fatima Jorge, Keith and Judy Scott, in loving memory of Margarida Da Costa, Joaquim and Madalena Eusibio, Joaquim and Geraldina Cunha, David and Tanis Jorge, 'Stanley Park Horse-Drawn Tours and the O'Neil Family', Adelino Flores and Family, Isidro Flores and Family, Amigos de Pico Cultural Association, LiUNA! Local 1611, Governo dos Acores, SATA International, Carlow Faria and Michelle Pereira, Mike and Tammy Praticante, Tony and Mario Macedo, Christopher Flores and Family, Patricia Flores and Family, Portugese Seniors Foundation, F & F Concrete and the Antonio Family, Colleen Marchant, Luso Concrete LTD, Manuel and Connie Alvernaz, Perosa Insurance Agencies, Jane Marston and Family, Kevin and Christy Jorge, Grupo Folciorico Ilha Verde Cultural Association, Jose and Rosa Aquiar, Humberto and Lucinda Sousa, Jose Alvernaz, Lower Mainland Steel, Camara Municipal da Ribeira Grande, The Portugese Social Centre Association of Castlegar B.C.

Supported by the City of Vancouver and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation

Where is the Portugese Joe Statue in Stanley Park?

The Portugese Joe Statue is located next to the Totem Poles at Brockton Point.  Nearby is the Legends of the Moon gift shop and concession stand, West and North Vancouver Lookout and the Brockton Playing Fields.

Stanley Park Tour

PreviousNext

Social Media

Please share this page: